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Pamplemousse-rose-menthe
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After exercising, it’s important to quickly refuel your muscles! Choose a snack that is rich in carbohydrates and protein within 30 minutes of ending your workout. Dietary protein contributes to the regeneration of muscle protein after physical activity. And make sure you drink enough liquids to replenish fluids lost during exercise! The potassium found in grapefruit helps to replenish electrolytes after physical activity!

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Pommes-cannelle
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After exercising, it’s important to quickly refuel your muscles! Choose a snack that is rich in carbohydrates and protein within 30 minutes of ending your workout. Dietary protein contributes to the regeneration of muscle protein after physical activity. And make sure you drink enough liquids to replenish fluids lost during exercise! A reinvented and delicious crumble cake that contains carbohydrates and protein to help restore muscles after exercising!

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travel benefits
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We sometimes think of our travels as just the pretty pictures we take and the magnificent tan we get on tropical beaches. Yet the benefits of travel go beyond an eye-catching skin tone. Getting away is good for us, both psychologically and physically. Reduce daily stress One of the benefits often noticed when we travel is reduced stress. Lying on a beach with a good book or climbing the slopes of Everest, whatever activity you choose will probably help you to considerably reduce your stress after a few days, or even a few hours. Enjoy the sun’s benefits While the sun and its ultraviolet rays can be dangerous when we spend too much time exposed to them or without protection, the sun is also a formidable ally for our health. In fact, its rays enable us to synthesize vitamin D, essential to healthy bones. As well, the visible light emitted by the sun modifies the production of certain molecules in our bodies, which has a beneficial impact on our mood. Light therapy is now used to help treat seasonal depression during the winter, a period of the year when the percentage of sunshine is greatly reduced. Make a clean break(…)

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discovering colours
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Everything is pink: the house, the teddy bear, the tee-shirt, the car, the bedspread. Even if she knows colours, my three-year-old daughter has fun with the concept. With the hint of a smile and sparkles in her eyes, she swears that everything around her is pink. Perhaps it’s her way of checking the evolution of her learning – or just a way of teasing her mother. Discovering colours is an important learning process for preschool children. It usually takes place between the ages of two and six. “Knowing colours is a prerequisite for entering preschool,” says Francine Ferland, occupational therapist and Professor Emeritus at Université de Montréal. A school-age child’s knowledge will be refined by listing the shades: pale blue, dark grey, etc.”. Around the age of four, a child is generally able to name the usual colours. The little ones will integrate the notion of colours through games. Children need concreteness; they need to handle objects. Coloured blocks, sticks or pencils, and buttons (starting from the age of three) are recommended. A child’s curiosity may also be stimulated through games that don’t require any material. “For example, we show the child an item of a certain colour in the(…)

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count
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He counts the steps, the number of holes in his piece of cheese, the quantity of books on the bookshelf in the living room, the red tee-shirts in his clothing drawer. My six-year-old son is obsessed with numbers. He loves to count. A statistician-to-be? Maybe. But it is more likely that Pumpkin is going through a phase. Learning how to count is a skill all children try to acquire at some point in their development. “Before entering kindergarten, a child possesses basic mathematical knowledge”, explains Francine Ferland, occupational therapist and author of thirteen pieces on child development. Beyond knowing how to recite a series of numbers, a child learns how to count objects little by little. Around the age of two, children learn notions like “only one” and “several”, and then “a little” and “a lot”. Usually, around the age of three or four, they can count mechanically to ten. “They will be able to count between three and six items”, Ms. Ferland says. Around the age of five, children are able to count to 30 and can quantify up to ten objects displayed before them. Parents may use games to help their children learn how to count. Asking questions(…)

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