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market_family
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The grocery store is a great starting point to get kids interested in food, cooking and nutrition.38 Involve your child in planning meals and adding items to the grocery list. At the store, talk about how much food costs, where it comes from and howto make healthy choices. Teach them what food provides their body, for example dairy products such as yogurt provide calcium that contributes to the formation and normal development of bones and teeth. These tips can make your shopping experience more enjoyable: • Minimize stress. Timing is everything! Shop when the store isn’t busy. Don’t go when your child is tired or hungry. • Explore and experiment. Let your child pick a new vegetable or fruit in the produce section. • Ask for help. Have older children and teens help with reading food labels and comparing brands. • Set rules before you go. Have a plan to deal with requests for sweets and salty snacks you wouldn’t usually buy – and don’t give in! • Have fun! Make grocery shopping like a scavenger hunt for healthy foods. Give your child the list and apen to cross off items as they’re added to the cart. Bonus item!Take advantage of(…)

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discovering colours
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Everything is pink: the house, the teddy bear, the tee-shirt, the car, the bedspread. Even if she knows colours, my three-year-old daughter has fun with the concept. With the hint of a smile and sparkles in her eyes, she swears that everything around her is pink. Perhaps it’s her way of checking the evolution of her learning – or just a way of teasing her mother. Discovering colours is an important learning process for preschool children. It usually takes place between the ages of two and six. “Knowing colours is a prerequisite for entering preschool,” says Francine Ferland, occupational therapist and Professor Emeritus at Université de Montréal. A school-age child’s knowledge will be refined by listing the shades: pale blue, dark grey, etc.”. Around the age of four, a child is generally able to name the usual colours. The little ones will integrate the notion of colours through games. Children need concreteness; they need to handle objects. Coloured blocks, sticks or pencils, and buttons (starting from the age of three) are recommended. A child’s curiosity may also be stimulated through games that don’t require any material. “For example, we show the child an item of a certain colour in the(…)

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playing games
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At the age of eighteen months, my daughter would watch Baby Einstein videos, an educational TV show especially tailored for the little ones. She loved it. Now my three-year-old princess surfs through her favourite applications on the iPad and really enjoys tapping on her older brother’s DS console. Is it serious, doctor? Am I a bad mother? “Of course not!” says a friend, an early childhood educator. Any exposure to electronic games, whether online computer games, video games on a console, or games on a digital tablet, is harmful if excessive, according to the experts. The Canadian Paediatric Society recommends that children aged two and under not be exposed to screens. Between the ages of two and six, children should not spend more than two hours a day in front of any type of screen. However, electronic games do offer some advantages, according to Thierry Plante, a media education expert at the Habilo Médias national centre. “Online games present the same educational advantages as other games in general”, he says. He cites, for example, language games, puzzles, and other math games with which children “learn how to solve problems and gain self-confidence”. The older the child gets, the stronger the(…)

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Danino invites you to discover a Special Report that reveals the many ways playing can help your child to learn. Because growing while having fun is part of a happy childhood! See all

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